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The New Naturalist Library

The college has a wonderful collection of titles from the New Naturalist Library available to borrow from the college library. Published by HarperCollins, they cover a range of Natural History topics, encompassing both fauna and flora. Our selection on display in Reception covers topics such as Bats, Nature in Towns and Cities, and the Seashore.

Below are some synopses from www.newnaturalists.com to give you a flavour of this marvellous collection. Please contact the Library if you are interested in borrowing any of these titles, or would like to find out more about them.

British Bats Cover

British Bats, John Altringham

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 “In this book, John Altringham discusses all the different aspects of the natural history of bats, from their origins and evolution to their behaviour, feeding habits and reproduction. He also discusses the threats to the survival of bats, and how we are working to conserve them. Finally, he gives an account of how to watch and study bats in the wild.”

 

Books and naturalists cover

Books and Naturalists, David Elliston Allen

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“David Elliston Allen explores the often complicated ways in which books on the flora and fauna of these islands have been published through the years, from the earliest days of printing through to the era of the computerised distribution atlas and the giant multinational compendium.”

Nature in Towns and Cities

Nature in Towns and Cities, David Goode

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“David Goode uses his knowledge of urban ecology to describe the range of habitats and species which exist within urban areas, and shows how our understanding is being applied to encourage a greater variety of nature into towns and cities. He illustrates how an ecological approach can be incorporated within planning and design to create a range of habitats from tiny oases to extensive new urban woodland and wetlands.”

Dartmoor cover

Dartmoor, L. A. Harvey and D. St. Leger Gordon

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“The loneliest wilderness in England. This has been said more often of Dartmoor than any other part of our country. Traditionally in the world of fiction as well as that of fact, Dartmoor has been renowned as a vast empty moorland area, the property of nature rather than of man. It has always been the public’s idea of a lonely place. Not many generations ago it was regarded with a certain amount of awe. Nowadays it is one of our most important centres of recreation and an island of upland England of abundant interest to the naturalist. In 1951 it was nominated a National Park, one of the first of several places that have been so designated in Great Britain.”

Garden Natural History Cover

Garden Natural History, Stefan Buczacki

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“Though gardens are often viewed merely as artificial creations rather than easily accessible places to observe and encourage wildlife, ‘Garden Natural History’ rectifies this misconception. By viewing gardens within the wider context of the British ecological landscape, Buczacki follows the garden’s development as a habitat within which vertebrates, invertebrates and native and alien plants alike have been introduced and to which they have adapted.”

Moths cover

Moths, Mike Majerus

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“Michael Majerus, author of the popular New Naturalist Ladybirds, examines all aspects of moths, from their life histories to their role as pests to humans. He covers their reproduction, feeding, evolution, habitats and conservation.

New Naturalist Moths also discusses the enemies of moths, and the ways they have evolved to avoid detection, including camouflage, warning colouration, and mimicry.”

Bird Migration

Bird Migration, Ian Newton

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“Migration is shown by many kinds of animals, including butterflies and other insects, mammals, marine turtles and fish, but in none is it as extensively developed as in birds. The collective travel routes of birds span almost the entire globe, with some extreme return journeys covering more than 30,000 km. As a result of migration, bird distributions are continually changing – in regular seasonal patterns, and on local, regional or global scales.”

Seashore cover

Seashore, Peter J. Hayward

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“The seashore, with its endlessly changing tides, is one of the most fluctuating physical environments on the planet. Home to an abundance of animal and plant life, it is also one of the richest habitats the naturalist can explore. Here in Britain, we are fortunate to have a long and varied coastline, and our relatively large tidal ranges mean that our seashore offers a wide range of coastal habitats, including mud, sand, shingle and rock.”

Gulls cover

Gulls, John C. Coulson

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“There are more than 50 known species of gulls, and many of these are well-adapted to living in urban areas and in close proximity to humans. But there are also less familiar species to discover, which keep their distance from beachgoers. This long-overdue addition to the New Naturalist library explains the thorny issues of gull taxonomy and classification, then introduces readers to what it means to be a gull, physically and genetically. Chapters are divided by larger gull groups, and within these, distribution, lifecycles and behaviours are examined, as well as acclimation to the human world. Colour photography throughout offers ample opportunity to get a sense of the variation within the gull group, and makes this book a pleasure to look through.”

Woodlands cover

Woodlands, Oliver Rackham

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“Aimed at the non-specialist, ‘New Naturalist Woodlands’ investigates what woods are and how they function. In lively style, Rackham takes us through:

• How woods evolved and how they are managed
• The basic botany (understanding roots, partnerships, longevity, tree rings)
• Outline of woodland history
• Pollen analysis and wildwood
• Archives of woodland and how to study them
• Different types of woodland
• The rise and fall of modern forestry.”

Southern England cover

Southern England, Peter Friend

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“Most people share an enthusiasm for beautiful and breathtaking scenery, explored variously through the physical challenge of climbing to the top of the tallest mountains or the joy of viewing the work of a painter; but while easy to admire from a distance, such landscapes are usually difficult to explain in words. Harnessing recent developments in computer technology, the latest New Naturalist volume uses the most up-to-date and accurate maps, diagrams and photographs to analyse the diverse landscapes of Southern England.”

the broads cover

The Broads, Brian Moss

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“Broadland is set mostly in Norfolk and partly in Suffolk. The peat deposits in Broadland were dug in many places mainly during the 9th to 13th centuries. The pits eventually filled with water, giving us the Broads, 190 km of navigable water unimpeded by dams or locks.

Before the Second World War, Broadland was the epitome of richness of water plants and their associated animals, and was of international importance as a diverse wetland. Sadly, much of the richness has now gone, and the significance of Broadland lies more now in its significance in environmental restoration. The problems faced by the Broads are being experienced world-wide, and devising ways in which the Broads may be managed to restore the previous richness has produced a strategy of value throughout the world.”

Hedgehog

Hedgehog, Pat Morris

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“In a worrying development, the hedgehog’s plight appears to be worsening, with a new survey revealing a further decline in garden sightings. Their long-term but poorly understood decline is attributed to the loss and fragmentation of their habitat in Britain’s towns and countryside, death on roads, and intensive farmland that provides few good foraging or nesting sites. In this timely addition to the New Naturalist Library, Pat Morris provides a comprehensive natural history of this most elusive of mammals.”

Farming and Birds cover

Farming and Birds, Ian Newton

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“More than seventy per cent of Britain’s land surface is currently used for crop or livestock production, and in recent decades farming has experienced a major revolution. Not only has it become more thoroughly mechanised, it has also become heavily dependent on synthetic fertilisers and pesticides, and increasingly large-scale in its operation. These changes have brought crop yields and livestock production to levels previously considered unattainable. However, such high yields have been achieved only at huge financial and environmental costs. One of the most conspicuous, and best documented, consequences of modern agriculture has been a massive loss of wildlife, including birds.”